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Parent, Teacher, and Student Perspectives on How Corrective Lenses Improve Child Wellbeing and School Function
Dudovitz RN, Izadpanah N, Chung PJ, Slusser W
Sponsor/Institution: Vision to Learn and the UCLA Children's Discovery and Innovation Institute, and NIH/National Center for Advancing Translational Science
Publication: Maternal Child Health Journal

Published in 2016

Key Highlights:

  • Up to 20 % of school-age children have a vision problem identifiable by screening, over 80 % of which can be corrected with glasses.
  • While vision problems are associated with poor school performance, few studies describe whether and how corrective lenses affect academic achievement and health.
  • Further, there are virtually no studies exploring how children with correctable visual deficits, their parents, and teachers perceive the connection between vision care and school function.
  • Twenty parents, 25 teachers, and 21 students from three elementary schools participated.
  • Participants described how uncorrected visual deficits reduced students’ focus, perseverance, and class participation, affecting academic functioning and psychosocial stress; how receiving corrective lenses improved classroom attention, task persistence, and willingness to practice academic skills; and how serving students in school rather than in clinics increased both access to and use of corrective lenses.
  • Corrective lenses may positively impact families, teachers, and students coping with visual deficits by improving school function and psychosocial wellbeing.
  • Practices that increase ownership and use of glasses, such as serving students in school, may significantly improve both child health and academic performance.

To access the study, click here: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26649878

To download the full report, click here: Parent, Teacher, and Student Perspectives on How Corrective Lenses Improve Child Wellbeing and School Function

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