Glasses 4 Women

#Glasses
4WOmen

Stigmas Around Women Wearing Glasses Must Be Challenged

RECOGNIZING THE GLOBAL ISSUE

At the Vision Impact Institute, we’re raising awareness about this issue, and we want you to join us. We’ve launched a campaign on Twitter, LinkedIn, and Facebook called #Glasses4Women.
If you don’t already follow us on these channels, now is the perfect time to do so.

Search for #Glasses4Women and share, retweet or comment on our posts.
Thank you for standing up for women around the world and breaking down stigmas that prevent good vision for everyone!


55%


WOMEN MAKE UP 55% OF THE WORLD’S POPULATION WITH VISION IMPAIRMENT

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), 56% of the world’s blind and 55% of the people with vision impairment are women. When women are discouraged from correcting their vision, serious long-term consequences can result, including blindness.

NO GLASSES ALLOWED?

Recent reports aired by Japan’s Nippon TV and Business Insider Japan revealed that a number of women in Japan working in various industries have been instructed by their employers to refrain from wearing eyeglasses on the job.

The same rules do not apply to their male counterparts. Reasons given range from personal appearance to safety. The Vision Impact Institute applauds the thousands of social media users and news media that have reported on and spoken out against this unfortunate practice.

A FIRST IN SOUTH KOREA

This is not the first time that a story about women wearing glasses at work has made international headlines. In 2018, news anchor Lim Hyeon-Ju from South Korea became the first female news anchor in the country to wear eyeglasses on-air.

vision impairment through a gender lens

According to an article published by Devex, women and girls in low- and middle- income countries are disproportionately impacted by uncorrected vision impairment, untreated eye conditions, and blindness. Stigmas around wearing glasses are one of several barriers that women and girls face in getting poor vision corrected. “In South Asia, for example, girls can be viewed as “defective” — and therefore less likely to marry — rather than “effective” if they wear glasses,” said Kristan Gross, Global Executive Director at the Vision Impact Institute. In contrast, wearing glasses is perceived as making boys look intelligent.

We applaud women all around the world who are making their voices heard to overcome cultural barriers for women’s vision. Stories like these exist in all parts of the world. Let’s use them to spark dialogue and achieve a global consensus that women’s vision matters to us all.